Raul De Lara Guasco

Raul

De Lara Guasco

For being left-handed

2020, Pine, Chiclets gum, steel, brass, particle board, acrylic, 20 x 13 x 13 in

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Raul

De Lara Guasco

28 Years Later

2020, Pine, wisdom tooth, Texas Laurel weeds, red string, acrylic, Oak, sand, latex, Terracotta pigment, 80 x 18 x 20 in

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Raul

De Lara Guasco

DACA / Self-Portrait

2017-18, Pine, stone, silk, sarape, acrylic, MDF, 42 x 27 x 25 in

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Raul

De Lara Guasco

White Passing

2020, Linden, Pine, Zompantle, Oak, Texas Laurel seeds, Red string, epoxy, sand, acrylic, 65 x 14 x 12 in

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Raul

De Lara Guasco

Soft Siberian Elm

2020, Siberian elm, galvanized steel, 22 x 108 x 5 in

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Raul

De Lara Guasco

Zompantle / Us

2019, Zompantle, pine, walnut, neodymium magnets, lacquer, tzite seeds, red string, 82 x 24 x 24 in

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Coffee Chat: Raul de Lara and Virginia Lee Montgomery

Raul De Lara immigrated from Mexico to the United States at the age of 12 and has been a DACA recipient since 2012. Growing up in Texas as a non-English speaker, feeling neither from here nor there, his work now reflects on ideas of nationality, language barriers, body language and the sense of touch. His sculptures explore how stories, folklore, and rituals can be silently communicated through inanimate objects, tools, and foreign environments. De Lara often works with wood, a material that always shows the passing of time on its skin. His aesthetics and materials are inspired by the shared backyard between the United States and Mexico.

Virginia Lee Montgomery (VLM) is a filmmaker, sculptor, and facilitator working between Austin, Texas and New York, NY, USA. She received her BFA from The University of Texas at Austin in 2008 and her MFA from Yale University in Sculpture in 2016. Her artwork is a research practice of feminist metaphysics. VLM interrogates the complex relationship between physical and psychic structures. VLM also works as a professional scribe, a Graphic Facilitator. In her artwork, VLM turns her professional skill-set, "mind map scribing", inwards to render the contours of her subconscious and open portals into unknown psychic realms.

LIVE STREAMpre-recorded
What's it like to make art in Austin? An animated conversation
Nov 20
7:00 PM

Join us  for a panel unlike any other, because it’s a cartoon. Six members of the art  community cover topics like their fear of being reduced to a database entry,  where to find studio space that accommodates chainsaws, and how to avoid  being scammed by tech companies...all while appearing as bizarre, animated  versions of themselves.

The topics were taken from a recent survey where we asked artists across  Austin to list three ways they hope to see the art community improve.  Animating the panel is a fun way to embrace the virtual emphasis of this  year’s studio tours.

Featuring Celina Zisman, Laura Oxendine, Catie Lewis, Keith Kreeger, and  Raul De Lara

Animated and moderated by Kayla Lewis

LIVE STREAMpre-recorded
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Raul De Lara Guasco

About the Artist

Raul De Lara immigrated from Mexico to the United States at the age of 12, and has been a DACA recipient since 2012. Growing up in Texas as a non-English speaker, feeling neither from here nor there, his work now reflects on ideas of nationality, language barriers, body language and the sense of touch. His sculptures explore how stories, folklore and rituals can be silently communicated through inanimate objects, tools and foreign environments. De Lara often works with wood, a material that always shows the passing of time on its skin. His aesthetics and materials are inspired by the shared backyard between the United States and Mexico.

De Lara received his MFA in Sculpture + Extended Media from Virginia Commonwealth University and a BFA from the University of Texas at Austin. He has been awarded the Ox-Bow School of Art Fellowship, a Chicago Artists Coalition HATCH Residency, the International Sculpture Center Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award and the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown Fellowship. He is represented by Ethan Cohen gallery in New York City, and Reynolds gallery in Richmond, Virginia.

Artist Statement

I came to the desert to play with my homeland. No longer do I remember how she looks, feels, sounds, smells, or tastes. I came here because I miss her, and because she is invisible to me. I was given a map that clearly states where she begins, and where the United States ends. I didn't see her even when I swam across the Rio Grande into "Mexico" to collect dirt from the other side in a plastic bottle I found. This transparent water bottle holds her as this map does. How can someone turn a body of water into a wall? I kinda wish the border wall would have been there just to know where my nationality begins. A neighbor's fence tends to be made of wood, not this border.

"Are you a US citizen?" you You asked me at the border patrol check point outside the US national park. "Which mask will he prefer?" I wonder. I go ahead and hand you my Chicago drivers license, my Virginia student ID, my Texas car insurance and my Employment Authorization card issued by your federal government - you don't didn't like that. Before I was an immigrant, I was someone else - Raul. You never got a chance to know that mask. Not even when you were touching my forearms to get getting me out of my car and to place your cold handcuffs on me. I thought they would be warmer not only because we were in the middle of the desert, but also because, maybe, in other kinds of circumstances I would have liked them. You are not a snowman in the desert. As you sit sat me down in at the corner of the room, where you can could easily point your power at me, I asked you: "How big can one grow in a finite plot of land, in an invisible terracotta pot, in handcuffs?" That's when I discovered that not even you, who spends all day in the desert plucking people up from their pots, know why a desert is so bare.