Cheryl Finfrock

Cheryl

Finfrock

In a Dream, She Saw Through the Water's Veil

2020, Acrylic on Claybord, 12 x 16 x 2 in

$
550

Cheryl

Finfrock

Waiting on the M Train

2020, Acrylic on claybord, 12 x 14 x 2 in

$
525

Cheryl

Finfrock

Full Circle

2019, acrylic on claybord, 20 x 48 x 2 in

$
1800

Cheryl

Finfrock

Brooklyn Boys

2019, Scratchbord, 9 x 7 x 0.25 in

$
200

Cheryl

Finfrock

Boy and the Bird

2019, Graphite on claybord, 10 x 10 x 2 in

$
500

Cheryl

Finfrock

One Supper, Three Stories

2018, Acrylic on claybord, 20 x 48 x 2 in

$
1800
Canopy Corner Cocktail Hour
Nov 18
6:00 PM

Join Austin artists Kristy Battani, Ann Flemings, Cheryl Finfrock, and Lucy MacQueen in their studios with their favorite cocktails, while they share a behind the scenes peek into their working process.These artists have studios in the SW corner of Bldg 1 at Canopy and began weekly virtual visits during the shutdown. This is a continuation of those conversations. Join us!

LIVE STREAMpre-recorded
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Cheryl Finfrock

About the Artist

Cheryl Finfrock is a native Texan from Dallas, and a San Francisco transplant presently painting in Austin. She has enjoyed traveling and exhibiting in New York City, the West Coast, and in several European cities, including Berlin, Paris, and Sofia.

A Trinity University graduate in both art and literature, she explores the figure in its awkwardness, anonymity, and universality, creating a narrative steeped in the tradition of Texas storytelling.

Artist Statement

Being fascinated with surfaces that I can mark up, I work with lines that are scarred, scratched, and drawn on and into smooth surfaces. My current work is a study of people and places I met, spotted, conjured, and dreamed. I extrapolate images from media, old anonymous flea market photos, and some of my photography, all to be compiled and rebuilt. My surfaces are often unforgiving, and strangely, that characteristic draws me to it. These marks are permanent, like choices from our past. This process feels like a metaphor for human interaction. If a bad mark is unforgivable, the story ends there. But with forgiveness, the mistaken mark can be built upon or swayed, turned into a new idea. The work has space to become when the story is open-ended, the mark-making furthering the creation through its faults.